Love dirt roads? Really?

For some reason, country music songwriters (and singers) seem to love dirt roads. Think “Dirt Road Anthem” by Colt Ford and Brantley Gilbert, “Red Dirt Road” by Brooks & Dunn, or even “Dirt” (recorded by Florida-Georgia Line) written by Chris Tomkins and Rodney Clawson. ¬†For some reason, modern listeners seem to revel in the thoughts of gravel beneath the tires, red dirt swirling, and mud when it rains. I don’t get it, but lots of money goes to these artists, so I guess there is an attraction to dirt for lots of folks.

A few years ago, I heard Alan Jackson say that he doesn’t get that trend, and his song, “Blacktop” celebrates the paving of his country road, “back in ’65.” Since I’ve ridden a bit on dirt and a lot on pavement, I’m like Mr. Jackson, I’m all for paved roads.

Indeed, I prefer to avoid any dirt roads, or any roads that connect with dirt roads. The other day, I was the victim of the hour for a state trooper who told me that I should have slowed down by the dirt road, a narrow one that I didn’t even notice. I guess I’ll never write a lucrative country song, because I don’t even see dirt roads, much less worship them.