To Honor You Call Us— review and commentary

Space operas are one of my favorite reads. Throw in a nifty hero or heroine and some bad guys to whip and my interest goes up a level. H. Paul Honsinger does a really good job with this debut novel, which is the first installment in his Man of War series. Based on the rather awkward title and the not so original name of the series, I wasn’t expecting too much, but this novel has most of what I want in a novel in this genre.

Our hero, Max Robichaux, has the “right stuff” to be successful. While Honsinger is no David Weber, nor is Robichaux a match for Honor Harrington, this novel reminds me of the best of Weber, and is vastly better than Weber when he is at his verbose worst. The trivia of this universe is explained in such a manner than most science fiction readers will understand, and those who don’t have some grasp of sci-fi probably won’t be interested anyway.

The best space operas have nasty villains, and the rodent evolved Krags are really nasty. Robichaux is killing them as the story opens, and there are no Star Trek Roddenberryesque moments wherein the audience sees the villains as worthy of sympathy. Nope. These rats stay rats.

Supporting and minor characters enjoy far more development than in some space operas, and I especially liked the doctor, who begins as a bit of comic relief, but grows into his role as a major player on board the star destroyer Cumberland. The episodic story works well, as Honsinger gives his cast of characters plenty to do as they journey through space, and there is sufficient suspense to keep the reader swiping the pages. Fans of military fiction and space yarns should really enjoy this novel.

I didn’t actually pay for this novel, as it is part of the “free” reading available to Amazon Prime, but it is fairly priced at $4.99 as of this post.

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Daughters of the Night Sky— review

Historical fiction is a favorite genre, in part because it often gives new insight into a known era, but when it brings new knowledge, even better. As I like military fiction (sci fi or otherwise) and being a student of history, Daughters of the Night Sky appealed to me on several levels.

Author Aime K. Runyan does a fabulous job of bringing the exploits of the 588th Night Bomber Regiment to life. These women: pilots, navigators, mechanics, and armorers were collectively known as the “Night Witches” because they harried German troops under the cover of darkness. Their exploits would be remarkable due to the sexism rampant at the time, but that they were relegated to flying Polikarpov Po-2 planes, with wood and canvas bodies and open cockpits, made their jobs even more difficult. One of the characters refers to the planes as crop dusters, and indeed, these small aircraft seem a lot closer to than than true “bombers.” Their method of succeeding is astonishing, as they would cut the engine in their already low and slow aircraft, so there was little warning of their impending attacks. Once they had deployed their meagre payload (a maximum of six bombs) they re-ignited the engine and flew back to base to reload and attack once more. Some of the two women crews made as many as eighteen runs (sorties) in a single night.

Although highly fictionalized, with characters who might or might not be based on historical figures, the author makes every effort to get the details right, from the male uniforms, the hacked off military haircuts, and even the various stations where the regiment was based during its 1942-1945 deployment.

Daughters of the Night Sky is informative, suspenseful, and emotionally engaging. I read it in a single day, which is rare these days. Anyone who enjoys historical, military, or women’s fiction should really enjoy this novel.

For those who want to know more about the real 588th, here’s a good article published in Vanity Fair.

Shameless self-promotion

From Goodreads.comDirtball Cover: “extremely unique”

From Amazon.com: “Well written”

Trina Cole McQueen, the middle child of a wealthy shipping family, had been doing her duty as a pilot in the Confederation Fleet, knowing that when her service was done, she would rejoin her family. One evening, while on liberty from her ship, Trina is abducted by agents of the Confederation’s arch enemy, and soon Trina is on a one-way trip to the most primitive planet she has ever seen.

Instead of being a fighter pilot, Trina is sold as a slave, on a world where a horse is the fastest means of transportation, and weapons have blades. Culture shock ensues, but Trina is a strong woman who has every intention of surviving her experience on “Planet Dirtball,” regardless of what she must do.

Kindle Unlimited readers can journey with Trina for free, but others will only have to pay $2.99 for the trip. Check Pilar Savage’s novel via Amazon:

Link to Once Upon a Dirtball on Amazon:

Steel World by B.V. Larson— quick review and commentary

Steel World cover(Okay, y’all, I am going to be straight with you; even my quick review contains a spoiler or two.)

When I began the Kindle version of Steel World, I was all set to hate it. The main character and action seemed to be lifted right out of one of the first-person shooter war games that my son loves and I don’t. Then, the main character, who was actually playing such a game, is rousted into reality by his mother. His sweet little life of being a bored student has just been interrupted by some economic woes. Then I got interested.

In some ways, this story is a re-tread of many combo “coming of age” stories, melded with some “gung-ho” military action. But, I rather liked this take on the soldier who never dies. Larson’s imagination is really clever, and he writes in such a way to bring the reader into his vision. The cast of characters is a bit flat, but often military yarns suffer from that malady. It’s hard, practically and emotionally, to get attached to people who will either be transferred or killed off, so relationships are a bit more shallow. Very real, but shallow, none-the-less.

The basic premise of this novel is that future mercenaries will be Planet Earth’s contribution to the Galactic economy, as humans are very good at making war. The Galactic Empire’s contribution is the machine that makes clones of the soldiers’ bodies. So, the “undying” part is that when the soldier bites the dust, under the proper circumstances, he can be transferred into a new body and sent back into the fray. This saves lots of training, of course, as experienced personnel are not lost nearly as often as if they stayed dead.

Steel World is the first in a series of novels, and I will probably pick up part two, as I really did enjoy B.V. Larson’s take on future warfare.

The Temporary Agent— review and commentary

Recently, I read the Kindle version of The Temporary Agent by Daniel Judson. While well-written, this novel didn’t grab me and keep my attention. One of the reasons that I (or most folks) read fiction is to get involved with some characters who are embroiled in conflict to see how those characters manage, thus entertaining me and providing some catharsis as well.

In The Temporary Agent, the opening scene has the reader immediately seeing that this is a novel of death and dire straits. “Cahill was no stranger to suffering…but the night he lost Erica was without a doubt the longest of his life.” This novel has really short chapters, and the first five comprise Part One where the exposition and action swiftly intertwine, and I was really getting interested. Then came Part Two, which changes the point of view character and the pace of the story. As the next fifty five chapters unfold (yes, that’s a lot of chapters) the pace does pick up, but the second POV character, who turns out to be the titular character, is not as interesting as the guy in part one. So…that is a huge flaw. Basically, the author grabbed me in part one, but let go of his grip in parts two, three, and four. Again, the novel is well-written with lots of interesting details and plenty of action, but I just didn’t care as much about the characters that came after those in the first part. And, for the reader to be really interested, the main characters have to be multi- dimensional and engaging, and it helps a lot of the secondary ones are fleshed out, too.

Fans of espionage novels, military action, or crime fiction will probably enjoy The Temporary Agent. While I did finish it, I kept thinking that it would have been a better story if the POV had stayed with Mr. Cahill and his lost love, Erica.

The Winter Over— quick review

I just finished a Kindle book, The Winter Over, by Matthew Iden, and it is a very suspenseful yarn. The setting is a station at the South Pole, and the scenario is that a select group of scientists and support personnel are going to spend nine months, most of it in total darkness, at the station. Of course, with just a few people confined to a fairly small space, having genial personalities is a requirement. During the exposition of this novel, an astute reader might begin to question whether or not this diverse group was properly screened. Perhaps the greatest flaw in this story is trying to keep the cast of characters straight.

(spoilers ahead)

The main point of view character is an engineering tech named Cass, who seems to be able to repair darned near anything, as might be expected, but she also has some skeleton in her mental closet. An accident, which might not be an accident introduces a “who dun it” plot line, but the story is more complicated than that. Indeed, as the group goes through the winter over, and as the situation becomes more and more stressful, in part due to intentional sabotage, Cass comes to realize that this station has become some sort of psychological experiment. The author skillfully blends the man vs. man and man vs. nature conflicts inherent in this setting.

Despite the extreme cold, things get hotter and hotter in the station, and the suspense builds. The ending, while not especially satisfying, is certainly organic. Overall, this is a good book, and I intend to see what else this author has written.

Sex, Lies, and Sweet Tea— a quick review

Yep, it is a book, an ebook as well as a paperback. Kris Calvert’s story is actually well-written, and I especially enjoyed the back and forth point of view between FBI Agent, Mac Callahan, and his new found love, Samantha Peterson. Each of them sees something special in the other, right from the outset, so their relationship moves swiftly. There are a few plot twists, mostly in the romantic realm, but the story kept me swiping the pages. There’s a great supporting character, Sam’s aunt Mimi, and a few cardboard cut-outs, such as the staff at Callahan’s inherited mansion. Still, it is a good read for the money (free for Kindle readers.)

Some other reviewers have stated that it isn’t realistic. Ho-hum. If I want reality, there are better ways to get it than via a novel. I rather like my fiction to be, well, fictional. As long as the author doesn’t push things too far, of course. Ms. Calvert does challenge the reader’s patience from time to time, but overall this novel is a pleasant way to spend a few evenings, for readers of romance, mystery, or suspense. The southern setting is just like sweet tea— both tasty and refreshing.